Sally J. Naish, Principal
781.859.9993
sally@lightandshadegardens.com

Front Entry and Barren Lawn Transformed

The yard of this recently built home still showed the mark of the builder’s hand:  In front, no connection between front porch and driveway; foundation plantings poorly chosen.  In back, a token tree tucked in a corner; otherwise, nothing but a large expanse of lawn.  A sweeping, wide stone path now leads from street and driveway to the front entry.  In back, a stone patio offset from the deck provides a charming destination surrounded by plantings.

Linear front walk with no access to driveway.
Wide curving stone walkway links front porch and driveway.
No privacy on porch with low foundation plantings.
Well-placed tree lends privacy to porch.
Yard uninviting except for play set.
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Stone wall separates lawn from wall-top garden.
Planting bed at base of wall connects wall-top garden with yard.

The narrow linear path from street to steps offered no access to the driveway.

The narrow linear path from street to porch steps gave no access to the driveway.

Linking the steps to street and driveway, this wide curving stone path softens the verticality of the porch columns and creates a welcoming entry.

Linking the front porch to both the street and the driveway, this wide curving stone path softens the verticality of the porch columns and creates a welcoming entry.

The low foundation plantings leave the porch exposed.

The low foundation plantings lend no privacy to the front porch.

A well-placed tree provides light screening without blocking view from front porch.

A well-placed tree provides just sufficient screening to give a sense of privacy without blocking the view from the front porch.

There is nothing inviting in the yard except the play set.

There is nothing inviting in the yard except the play set.

Offset from, but connected to, the deck, this stone patio becomes an attractive destination.

Offset from, but connected to, the deck by stepping stones, this charming stone patio edged with fragrant plants becomes an attractive destination.

A beautiful, but long and bare stone wall separates the lawn from the wall-top garden.

A beautiful, but long and bare stone wall separates the lawn from the wall-top garden.

A planting bed that includes the corner dogwood tree extends in front of the wall and connects the wall-top garden with the rest of the yard.

Planting bed containing tree extends in front of wall and connects wall-top garden with yard.

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Exposed Street Corner

Located at an urban intersection, the yard of this large two-family house had little to offer to either the homeowners or passersby.  The continuous row of evergreens appeared to separate the house from the lawn; the taller shrubs blocked light and views at several windows.  The goal was to reclaim the yard and create a beautiful, welcoming garden for the homeowners that would complement the house and enhance the streetscape.  Removing the yews added significantly to the available space, allowing the planting of trees and the creation of a path that winds through the garden, beneath an arbor, and ultimately connects the front walk to the driveway in the rear.

The row of evergreens appear to separate the house from its front yard.
Year-round interest is provided by a mix of deciduous and evergreen shrubs and perennials.
Overgrown shrubs block both light and views
Woodchip path winds through trees, shrubs and arbor
Foundation evergreens accentuate mass of the house on this exposed corner.
Trees counterbalance mass of house
Tree-strip needed facelift
Tough plants for tree-strip

Front yard looks the same year-round

Front yard offers nothing of interest and looks the same year-round.

Mix of deciduous and evergreen shrubs for year-round interest.

A mix of deciduous and evergreen shrubs provide structure and can be enjoyed from both the porch and the sidewalk.

Overgrown shrubs block light to the interior

The overgrown foundation evergreens block the light to the interior and views to the exterior.

The woodchip path draws the eye and the visitor among the plants and beneath the arbor towards the front yard.

Foundation evergreens accentuate mass of the house.

The continuous row of evergreen shrubs accentuate the mass of this two-family home.

Although not yet fully grown, the new trees are already helping to counterbalance the mass of the building

Although not yet fully grown, the new trees are already helping to counterbalance the mass of the building.

The tree-strip too needed a face-lift

The tree-strip too needed a facelift.

Tough plants were chosen to withstand the inhospitable conditions

The toughest plants used in the design for the yard were chosen to withstand the inhospitable conditions of the tree-strip.

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Garden Design Workshop – April 15 & 29, 2014

Sally will once again be teaching a Garden Design Workshop through Arlington Community Education.  She will introduce you to the basic principles and techniques of the landscape design process, and in the second session give you the opportunity for an exchange of ideas for areas of your own property.  Registration is limited to 10 students.

Ecological Landscaping Association Annual Conference – Feb. 26 & 27, 2014

Sustaining the Living Landscape
February 26 & 27, 2014  MassMutual Center, 1277 Main Street, Springfield, MA

Wednesday Night Keynote Speaker:  Dr. John Todd – Healing the Waters:  A Tale of Ecology and Living Technologies

Intensive Workshops:  1) Maintaining Tree Health; 2) Soil:  The Base Layer of Ecological Health

Panel Discussion:  Seeing the Forest for the Trees

More details and Registration

 

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